The advantages and problems of multifactor authentication

The advantages and problems of multifactor authentication

Written By: Admin

If you use one of the many cloud-based email services available – such as Gmail – you’ve probably been asked to add a phone number to your account so that your identity can be verified. Or, maybe you’ve worked at a company that issues key fobs with constantly changing codes that – in conjunction with a user name and password – are needed to log into your virtual desktop.

Both of these are examples of multifactor authentication. Unlike single factor authentication, which utilizes just a user name and password, multifactor authentication adds another layer to verify your identify.

Whether it be through inherence – such as a biometric fingerprint – or possession – such as the key fob example above- multifactor authentication is considered more secure since it eliminates the ability for a bad actor to access private accounts and data simply by acquiring a user’s login and password. However, multifactor authentication is not without its challenges and shortcomings.

We recently had the opportunity to sit down with Jeff Schmidt, the CEO of Authomate, to discuss multifactor authentication, why it’s more secure than single factor authentication, and the reasons why some companies have yet to embrace it.

Here is what Jeff had to say:

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1 Comment

  1. PODCAST – The effectiveness of location and intent as authentication factors - Access Granted
    PODCAST – The effectiveness of location and intent as authentication factors - Access Granted2 years ago

    […] for multifactor authentication for both consumers and enterprises, and have discussed some of the different authentication factors that today’s solutions utilize to ensure that a user is – in fact – who they say they […]

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